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In Remembrance of Me: Feasting with the Dead in the Ancient Middle East | The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.

Revolving dining room in Emperor Nero’s luxurious palace really existed | Ancient Origins.

Stour Valley Community Archaeology’s first excavation reveals tantalising clues at Bulmer site. Dr Carenza Lewis points out some of the features.
Emma Brennan West Suffolk chief reporter Friday, June 13, 2014
10:08 AM

A community archaeology group has unearthed some interesting clues to the ancient history of an area on the outskirts of Sudbury.

Stour Valley Community Archaeology (SVA) has just held its first excavation over two weekends at Goldingham Hall in Bulmer, on the Suffolk/Essex border.

The dig was made possible thanks to a grant of £2,500 from Dedham Vale and Stour Valley Environmental Fund via the Essex Community Foundation.

The group was also able to use equipment donated by Marilyn Matthews, the widow of amateur archaeologist Mick Matthews, who took part in many excavations in the Stour Valley and particularly enjoyed metal-detecting.

The inaugural day’s digging was dedicated to Mr Matthews’ memory, and his wife attended and saw the tools being put to good use.

The six days of excavating were supervised by a team of archaeologists from Access Cambridge Archaeology under the leadership of Dr Carenza Lewis, who is best known for her appearances on Channel 4’s Time Team and Michael Wood’s Story of England.

The site at Goldingham Hall was chosen because geophysical surveys carried out last year revealed many interesting features that were previously unknown.

SVCA committee member Nick Moore said the dig concentrated on three features, which after many hours of backbreaking digging and sieving eventually revealed a large complex containing a food preparation area with six bread ovens and a series of ditches filled with burnt pottery and bones.

Post-excavation analysis will reveal specific dates, but preliminary thoughts date the site to late Anglo-Saxon or Norman times.

Mr Moore added: “Many finds were discovered, including an in situ medieval arrowhead, and most incredibly, a ‘flint face’ found at the bottom of the post hole of the structure. We are wondering if this could have been a good-luck charm placed in the foundations of the building.

“We would like to reiterate our thanks to Marilyn for donating the equipment, which has been put to great use and is very much appreciated.” Stour Valley Community Archaeology was formed in late 2013 as a legacy of the Heritage Lottery-funded Managing A Masterpiece project.

Original article :

east.co.uk

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4th of July

Happy 4th to everyone!

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Insect diet helped early humans build bigger brains, study suggests | Newsroom | Washington University in St. Louis.

Did Neanderthals eat their vegetables? First direct evidence of plants in Neanderthal diet — ScienceDaily.

Originally posted on British Museum blog:

Bryony Dixon, curator of silent film, British Film Institute

From Cairo to the Pyramids ( Pathé, 1905).

From Cairo to the Pyramids ( Pathé, 1905).

The British Museum’s new exhibition Ancient lives, new discoveries uses the latest imaging technology to help us understand the realities of life and death in ancient Egypt. We have all seen computer-generated images of mummies brought to life in film and TV, for example in The Mummy film franchise that produced 6 films between 1998 and 2012. But if we go back to the late 19th and early 20th century, the Museum visitor would have had a similar preparation. When cinema was born in the 1890s, audiences that came to see the latest novelty would already have been thoroughly familiar with images of ancient Egypt after a century of Egyptomania ? Napoleon’s conquest of Egypt in 1798, high profile excavations, public mummy unwrappings and Champollion’s well publicised decipherment of the hieroglyphs on the

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