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Posts Tagged ‘cooking pots.Bronze age’

 

Photo taken on Nov. 7, 2018 shows the bronze pot containing the liquid unearthed from a Western Han Dynasty (202 BC to AD 8) tomb in Luoyang, central China’s Henan Province. Archaeologists on Tuesday poured liquid out of a bronze pot unearthed from the tomb into a measuring glass, giving off an aroma of rich wine.

 

original article:

Xinhuanet.com

ZHENGZHOU, Nov. 6 (Xinhua) — Archaeologists in central China’s Henan Province on Tuesday poured liquid out of a bronze pot unearthed from a Western Han Dynasty (202 BC to AD 8) tomb into a measuring glass, which gave off an aroma of rich wine.

“There are 3.5 liters of the liquid in the color of transparent yellow. It smells like wine,” said Shi Jiazhen, head of the Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology in the city of Luoyang.

He said the discovered content needs to undergo further lab research so the team can accurately ascertain the ingredients of the liquid.

A large number of color-painted clay pots and bronze artifacts were also unearthed from the tomb, which covers 210 square meters. The remains of the tomb occupant have been preserved, said Shi.

He said they will conduct lab research on items found in the main tomb chamber.

Similar-aged rice wine had earlier been found in other tombs dating back to the Western Han period. Liquor made from rice or sorghum grains were a major part of ceremonies and ritual sacrifices in ancient China. It was often contained with elaborate bronze cast vessels.

Shi said the bronze pot containing the liquid is one of the two big bronze items unearthed from the tomb. The other is a lamp in the shape of a wild goose, which was the first of its kind found in the city of Luoyang, capital of 13 dynasties, with a history of 3,000 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prehistoric pit discovered on Coney Island beach

Coney Island, in County Sligo, Ireland, is one of several islands of the same name off the coast of Ireland. It is an island of approximately 400 acres and is named after the vast quantity of rabbits which can be spotted on the island at any time (Coney (/ˈkoʊni/, historically /ˈkʌni/) is an English word for a rabbit or rabbit hair, deriving from the Latin cuniculus, meaning “rabbit”

From Wikipedia

Archaeologists have discovered signs of human habitation, possibly dating back 4,000 years, on Sligo’s Coney Island.

A box-like structure built from large stone slabs found on the island may have been used for bathing or cooking during the Bronze Age, experts believe. It has been excavated by a team led by Eamonn Kelly, director of Irish Antiquities at the National Museum.

The structure is thought to be part of a fulacht fiadh, a prehistoric trough or pit that was dug into the ground and filled with water. Stones, heated separated on an outdoor hearth, would be added to bring the water to boil.

Measuring about a metre long and 80cm wide, the structure was recently identified as an archaeological site by Ciaran Davis, an archaeology student at IT Sligo, and native of nearby Rosses Point, who alerted the museum.

“It tells us that people walked the beach here 3,000 or 4,000 years ago, searched for large stone slabs, and carefully built this structure,” said Mr Davis. “Many other archaeological sites probably await discovery on Coney.”

There are thousands of Bronze Age fulacht fiadh throughout Ireland, but to find one on a beach is a rare event, said Dr Marion Dowd, a lecturer at IT Sligo.

“I know of one other example in Cork. It makes us wonder why they would have wanted to heat saltwater.”

Hot water was typically used for cooking, bathing, washing, dyeing textiles and brewing alcohol, but the use of saltwater meant brewing was not the purpose of the Coney island device, Dr Dowd said.

Radiocarbon dating will determine the exact age of the discovery.

The structure has been known locally as the “lovers’ wishing well”, said Dr Dowd. The legend was that anyone who lay inside it would dream of the person they were going to marry. It was also known as “the sailor’s grave”.

Mr Kelly described the find as “very significant” and said it was “quite extraordinary” that the structure had remained undisturbed despite being known to local people for decades.

“It shows the absolute respect the community has for it, perhaps because some thought it was the grave of a sailor,” he said. “But we have seen grave sites elsewhere which were plundered.”

Currently one family lives full-time on Coney, but there are a number of holiday homes on the island, which is popular with day trippers who can drive or walk across via Cummeen Strand during low tide.

By marese-mcdonagh
Sep 11, 2014
Original article:
irish times

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Volunteers excavate the box-like archeological structure on Coney Island. The site may date back 4,000 years

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