Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘fermentation’

Xinhuanet.com

HEFEI, Sept. 5 (Xinhua) — Chinese archaeologists have discovered the ruins of an ancient distillery, the largest of its kind ever found in the country, local authorities said Wednesday.

The distillery dates back to the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties and it was discovered by construction workers by accident in Suixi County, east China’s Anhui Province, according to the provincial institute of heritage and archaeology.

Archaeologists have excavated 3,000 out of a total area of 18,000 square meters, unearthing a series of facilities used for making distilled spirits in ancient times, such as three distillation stoves and more than 30 fermenting tanks, according to Chen Chao, associate researcher with the institute.

Meanwhile, over 600 items including drinking vessels, cigarette holders and snuff bottles have been excavated so far at the site.

Currently, the excavation work is still ongoing.

“This is the fourth ancient distillery workshop ruins ever found by Chinese archaeologists. The complete and well-preserved excavated equipment represents the distilled liquor making craftsmanship in northern China,” Chen said.

Before the discovery, two ancient distilleries were unearthed in southwest China’s Sichuan Province and another one was found in east China’s Jiangxi Province.

Read Full Post »

Tasting Beer

Tasting Beer

125 year old beer

125 year old beer

Original Article:

cnn.com

By Amanda Jackson, CNN, January 2016

(CNN)A scuba diver, a researcher and a beer enthusiast walked into a lab and uncorked the mystery of an antique bottle of beer.

Jon Crouse, an amateur scuba diver and treasure hunter from Nova Scotia, found the bottle of beer at the bottom of Halifax Harbor in November. He kept the bottle, wondering what was inside it and if it was drinkable. The bottle seemed to be well-sealed, and it had a cork inscribed with “A. Keith & Son Brewery.”
On Wednesday, the mysterious, murky liquid was identified.

Crouse enlisted the help of Christopher Reynolds, co-owner of Stillwell Beer Bar in Halifax, and Andrew MacIntosh of Dalhousie University, who specializes in fermentation research. The team tested the bottle to make sure there was beer inside, and not seawater, before daring to take a swig.
“It tasted surprisingly good, and surprisingly like beer,” Reynolds told CNN affiliate CTV.
MacIntosh felt differently. He said he tried the beer “for the sake of science.”

“You wouldn’t want to drink any of it,” he said.

Researchers will continue to analyze the beer to determine what chemicals were used to make it.

“This will give us insight into how it was brewed in the 1800s,” said MacIntosh.

CNN’s Jennifer Moore contributed to this report.

 

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: