Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘history’

This one cannot be consumed but in these uncertain times it brings happiness to me and I hope to you.

This little one is a Phramipedium orchid, another type of Lady Slipper Orchids. We got this at the last orchid guild meeting…before the stay at home order.

this orchids name is Phag of Rita and is for Rita Roberts.

Phag of Rita

Read Full Post »

On this day ten years ago…
via Lava bread, anyone? Pompeii snack bar rises from ashes after 2,000 years

Read Full Post »

On this day ten years ago…
via Valley in Jordan inhabited and irrigated for 13,000 years

Read Full Post »

On this day ten years ago…
via Victoria suburb yields 850 BC archeological site

Read Full Post »

On this day ten years ago…
via The impact of the diffusion of maize to the Southwestern United States

Read Full Post »

Akrotiri Dig site photo credit Ministry of Culture of Greece

Greece.greekreporter.com

Significant new findings were recently revealed during ongoing excavation works at the archaeological site of Akrotiri, on the Greek island of Santorini (Thera), the Ministry of Culture of Greece announced in a statement on Thursday.

Most of the discoveries are related to the everyday life of the people who lived on the island before the volcanic explosion which destroyed most of the island and subsequently the Minoan civilization on Crete.

Ordinary objects used by the people of the island, even including clothing and burned fruit, were found, most likely believed to be the very last objects the people of Santorini were using in the moments before the devastating volcanic eruption.

Additionally, more than 130 micelle vessels were found, which archaeologists believe were most likely related to a burial place.

The archaeological dig on Santorini is taking place under the auspices of the Greek Archaeological Society and under the direction of Professor Christos Doumas.

The statement from the Ministry of Culture informs the public that among the new discoveries are ”four vessels, partially discovered in earlier excavations.”

Other findings include bronze objects, including two large double braids and miniature horn cores, as well as small fragments and beads from one or more necklaces.

Among dozens of other new findings, the Ministry of Culture noted that an inscription, consisting of Linear A syllables and an ideogram, was found written in ink on an object which is most likely related to the use of a building, also uncovered in the dig.

The Ministry of Culture concluded by saying that scientists expect many additional smaller and larger findings to be uncovered in the next phases of the works, which continue at the Akrotiri site.

Akrotiri, a Bronze Age settlement from Santorini’s Minoan culture, was destroyed in a massive volcanic eruption sometime in the 16th century BC.

The city was completely buried in volcanic ash, which preserved the remains of fine frescoes and many other artworks and objects, much like what occurred later in the city of Pompeii, near Italy’s Mt. Vesuvius.

 

Read Full Post »

My Oncidium orchid won first prize last Sunday at my Orchid society. A picture was requested by one of the followers of this blog so here it is:

Oncidium orchid

Now since this is a food blog I thought I would also point out that Vanilla comes from an orchid. This is what the American Orchid Society says about the species:

Vanilla belongs to a group that includes some of the most primitive orchids. The name is derived from the Spanish word vainilla meaning small pod and is characterized by vine-like plants that climb and branch. A leaf and short roots that attach to tree trunks and branches are present at each node. The flowers, produced from congested racemes opposite the leaf axils, are large and showy and short-lived, but produced in succession so that the plant is attractive for weeks or even months at a time. Vanilla is one of the few orchids, other than those grown for the cut flower trade, with widespread commercial use. V. planifolia is widely cultivated for its long, slender, fleshy pods that are essential for the manufacture of vanilla flavoring.
In addition to its commercial value, the presence of fleshy, fragrant seed pods and seed with a hard seed coat may also prove indispensible to the understanding of orchid evolution. These characteristics suggest animal-mediated seed dispersal. Recent research has established the pollinator to be a Euglossine bee (also called Orchid Bees) consistent with the pollination of many very fragrant orchids in the neotropics. However, it has also been reported that the seed capsules are eaten by bats thereby effecting seed dispersal.
The pantropical yet isolated distribution of Vanilla, coupled with the ephemeral nature of the flowers has given rise to significant confusion as to the number of species in the genus.

Vanilla Orchid

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: